Your Hendrix Odyssey

February 2011 Odyssey Grant recipients

 

Hendrix Odyssey Program 

Project Funding 

February 2011 

 

The Committee on Engaged Learning (CEL) has awarded $218,241.03 in Odyssey grants to 65 projects proposed by faculty and students. This is the highest number of projects funded in any cycle in the history of the program. The grand total for funding since the Odyssey Program’s inception in 2005 is $1,745,203.66.  The CEL gratefully acknowledges the generous support of both the Hendrix-Murphy Foundation Programs in Literature and Language and Project Pericles in this funding cycle. 

 

Students will delve deeply into languages that interest them, explore ancient healing methods, shed light on long-hidden history, and conduct research that could alleviate pain. 

 

The Odyssey Grant recipients include: 

 

Haley Aaron 

Complex Brain Function Lab 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

Sponsor: Dr. Amrita Puri 

and 

Georgia Belk 

Research at Arkansas Children’s Hospital: Complex Brain Function Laboratory 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

Sponsor: Dr. Leslie Zorwick 

 

This summer, Haley Aaron and Georgia Belk will work with Dr. John Chelonis at the Complex Brain Function Laboratory at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. They will investigate how children diagnosed with or medicated for conditions such as depression or ADHD perform on behavioral tasks compared to other children.  The test will focus on short-term memory and attention, color and position discrimination, motivation to work for food, time perception and learning. “I will learn how to analyze and score different psychological tests and will be introduced and familiarized with statistical analysis computer generated programs,” Aaron said. “Working in the Complex Brain Functioning Laboratory will engage me in a research experience that will prepare me for graduate school and beyond,” Belk added. 

 

Katharine Abbott 

Internship with New Orleans Metropolitan Center for Women and Children 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Lisa Leitz 

 

There is a shortage of women’s shelters in New Orleans, leaving many women and children suffering from abuse unsure of their options. Katharine Abbott will spend 12 weeks this summer working at the New Orleans Metropolitan Center for Women and Children, which is unique for having a director with a Masters of Business Administration who applies business principles to serving the community. “By working closely with those running this large shelter, I will learn how to most effectively lead a large organization and to understand how large groups operate,” Abbott said. She plans to use what she learns in her future career as a counselor or social worker. 

 

Dillon Blankenship 

Getting Back to the Natural State: A Survey of Native Pollinators in Arkansas 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

Sponsor: Dr. Joyce Hardin 

 

Agriculture depends on native pollinators such as bees, butterflies, and other insects to transfer pollen between flowers for fertilization. The primary pollinator has been the honey bee, but in recent years, their colonies have been unstable. This has lead to an interest in other pollinators. The last survey of native pollinators in Arkansas was done more than 45 years ago. This summer, Dillon Blankenship will update that survey focusing on the Arkansas Valley. “Native species have always maintained a role in agricultural pollination to some extent, but their presence is especially important in natural settings,” Blankenship said. 

 

Stephen Borutta 

Ecogrease Lightning 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Rev. J. J. Whitney 

 

Stephen Borutta will be taking a cross-country trip in a converted bus that runs on straight vegetable oil for Ecogrease Lightning, a non-profit agency with a goal of promoting environmentally sustainable lifestyles through education and demonstration. He and four other college sophomores will stop at cities from Maine to California doing service work and giving environmental education presentations. “When this project is through we will have done at least 700 hours of volunteering, held seven educational experiences, travelled 10,000 miles, lived on a bus for seven weeks, taught hundreds of people how to be more environmentally aware, raised awareness for many service organizations, and made a difference in communities all over the United States,” Borutta said.  

 

Megan Childress 

Medicine in the Outdoors:  Becoming a Wilderness EMT 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Jennifer Dearolf 

 

Medical emergencies can happen anywhere—even in remote areas. A certified Wilderness EMT is trained to provide medical attention without the resources available in an urban setting. This summer, Megan Childress will participate in the National Outdoor Leadership School’s Wilderness Medical Institute program to earn her certification. “My experience will include four weeks of learning practical medical skills by receive classroom education and participating in mock rescues and scenarios in the wilderness,” Childress said. When she returns, she plans bring her skills along when the Hendrix Outdoors Club goes adventuring. 

 

Linh Chuong 

Re-education Camp Life Stories 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

Sponsor: Dr. Anne Goldberg 

 

Military men who fought in the Army of the Republic of Viet Nam (ARVN) were detained in “re-education camps” under barbarous and inhumane conditions. Many of them came to the United States in 1988 through the Orderly Departure Program. Linh Chuong’s father was one of these soldiers. This summer, she will record the life stories of the men, particularly their struggles and the human rights violations against them.  In Vietnam, the men were not allowed to reveal the true conditions in the camps. “As an observer and a member of their community, I would like to help them voice their opinions and thoughts to create a history that is more complete and whole,” Chuong said. This project was underwritten by the generous support of the Hendrix Murphy Foundation Programs in Literature and Language. 

 

Christina Cole 

Russian Ethnicity: A Study of Russian Language and Culture 

Category: Global Awareness 

Sponsor: Dr. Anne Goldberg 

 

After eight weeks at the Critical Language Institute at Arizona State University learning the Russian language and culture, Christina Cole will travel to Kazan, the capital of the Republic of Tatarstan for an immersive experience that puts her knowledge to the test. “During the time spent in Kazan I will be able to study the culture and language more in-depth and reflect on ethnic identity—specifically the Russian ethnic identity,” Cole said. As the granddaughter of a Russian immigrant, she’s also interested in learning about her own heritage. This project was underwritten by the generous support of the Hendrix Murphy Foundation Programs in Literature and Language. 

 

Jessica Crane 

Exploring the Pages of Medieval and Renaissance Europe 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Sasha Pfau 

 

During the Medieval and Renaissance periods, the changing practices of the oral tradition led to the creation of documents, manuscripts, and books that were valued as prized possessions. “I have always been fascinated with the restoration, conservation, and preservation of these items,” Jessica Crane said. To learn more about these rare items from those who work with them daily, she will visit four museums renowned for their collections: the British Museum, the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, the National Library of the Netherlands and the Museum Meermanno in Den Hague. This project was underwritten by the generous support of the Hendrix Murphy Foundation Programs in Literature and Language. 

 

Annalisa Crosmer 

Studying Japanese Language and Culture in Japan 

Category: Global Awareness 

Sponsor: Dr. Peter Gess 

 

After an introductory course in Japanese language and writing, Annalisa Crosmer realized that more intensive studies should be done in Japan. This summer, she will travel to Niigata, Japan, to participate in a special program at Airline, International, and Resort College. “Along with learning the Japanese language, I will learn about the culture and participate in various cultural activities that are essential for immersing myself in the environment,” Crosmer said. Her summer will include attending a Japanese music festival and participating in a tea ceremony. This project was underwritten by the generous support of the Hendrix Murphy Foundation Programs in Literature and Language. 

 

Lyndsey Czapansky 

Environmental Conservation and Education: Tamil Nadu 

Category: Service to the World 

Sponsor: Dr. Anne Goldberg 

 

Through Projects Abroad, Lyndsey Czapansky will promote environmental conservation by participating in an eco-development project and teaching in Tamil Nadu, located in southeast India.  She will learn about local organic practices, including how to produce a natural fertilizer using earthworms. “This project is an incredible mix of my passions, giving me the opportunity to learn about sustainable agriculture, education, and culture while serving a people I feel deeply connected to,” Czapansky said.  She will also serve as an English teacher in local schools while staying with a host family. 

 

Samantha Deragowski 

Catholic Campus Ministry Belize Mission Trip 

Category: Service to the World 

Sponsor: Dr. Gabe Ferrer 

 

Samantha Deragowski, Audrey Lloyd, Annemarie Beck, Caty Hensy, Jordan Henderson, Anna Roane and Jordan Spennato will help create Christian youth groups with a focus on education, tutor children and work on construction projects on a mission trip to Belize with Catholic Campus Ministry.  “There is a dual purpose for this trip: we will strive to improve the lives of those who live in poverty, and through spiritual training and reflection, we will grow in our own spirituality,” they said. 

 

Claudia Doke 

Volunteering in Yaroslavl 

Category: Service to the World 

Sponsor: Dr. Jay Barth 

 

Claudia Doke developed an interest in Russia and its culture after focusing on its history in a course last fall. She’ll spend time this summer volunteering as needed in Yaroslavl, called the cultural capital of the “Golden Ring” of ancient cities northeast of Moscow. Working through Cross Cultural Solutions, she’ll have the opportunity to assist the needy at a variety of different sites. “The Russian government has requested that volunteers help with arts and crafts because it is considered therapeutic for those who are likely to develop at-risk behaviors,” she explained. The activities will be appropriate for individuals of all ages and developmental levels, with a focus on mental stimulation and creativity. 

 

Leila Doolittle 

Shamanic Healing in a Modern World 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Ann Willyard 

 

“In various South American cultures, natural healing continues to play a major role in personal health and wellness,” Leila Doolittle said. She will explore alternative medicines in Peru, learning how shamans identify and combine plants for healing rituals, what properties each plant has and the ways this information is passed down. She will apply her studies in biology, chemistry and Spanish to the use of medicinal plants in the ancient healing traditions practiced throughout South America and increasingly as alternative medicine in North America and Europe. 

 

Elizabeth Elmore 

Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security: Service-Learning in Tanzania 

Category: Service to the World 

Sponsor: Dr. Joyce Hardin 

 

Elizabeth Elmore will work with Global Service Corp’s Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security Service-Learning Program in Tanzania.  “As a volunteer, I will be trained on methods of organic agriculture that focus on environmental sustainability and food security for small farmers,” Elmore said.  She notes that 40% of the country’s population lives in regions with chronic food deficits. In addition, 85% of impoverished citizens live in rural areas and rely on agriculture as their main source of income. Elmore will analyze the implications of food scarcity and approaches that have the greatest impacts on individual farmers and their communities. This project is co-sponsored with the generous support of Project Pericles. 

 

Rachel English and Paul Depre 

Piping Live: Glasgow International Piping Festival 2011 

Category: Global Awareness 

Sponsor: Dr. Eric Binnie 

 

Piping Live is an annual international bagpiping festival and competition held in Glasgow, Scotland. Rachel English and Paul Depre have an interest in bagpipes, and at the festival they will participate in workshops, attend lectures by world-renowned experts and instructors, and build on their existing playing skills. Museum exhibits will also help them learn more about the history and culture of bagpipes, the only instrument classified as a weapon of war. “Through this project we hope to improve our understanding of the role bagpipes play as a national symbol and integral part of the Scottish culture, as well as their international impact,” they said.  

 

Erin Ferriman 

Returning Family Programs Intern at the Denver Art Museum 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Rod Miller 

 

In her second year as a Family Programs intern at the prestigious Denver Art Museum, Erin Ferriman will work to create engaging and interactive activities for families. She will help design ideas for “The Summer of Clay,” an exhibit featuring the work of modern sculpture artists.  “The Denver Art Museum is a leader in family program development, focusing on innovative methods of family involvement,” Ferriman said. She will collaborate on activities that encourage an interaction with the art and the museum. 

 

Hannah Flatau 

Philosophy of Mathematics Research Project 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

Sponsor: Dr. Fred Ablondi 

 

This summer, the British Society for the History of Mathematics and the Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Mathematics will meet at Trinity University in Dublin, Ireland. Hannah Flatau will attend the conference and incorporate what she learns there into a larger research project on the Philosophy of Mathematics.  “Attendance at this conference will allow for an unparalleled glimpse into the areas of research currently being explored within the Philosophy of Mathematics,” Flatau said. 

 

Chengsi Gao and Ashley Lyman 

Pilgrimage to Mount Kailash-The Relationship Between Tibetans and the "Ten Thousand Things" 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Jay McDaniel 

 

Chengsi Gao and Ashley Lyman will travel to Tibet to explore the Chinese concept of “ten thousand things.” This concept encompasses every living thing including plants and animals, along with earth, air, water, and the entire natural world surrounding humans. They are interested in finding out how Tibetans maintain a harmonious relationship with nature instead of becoming “modern.”  They will travel to the sacred Mount Kailash; it is considered a Buddha, and no one is allowed to step foot upon the mountain. “Every Tibetan completes one circle around the mountain at least once in their lifetime in order to be blessed,” they said. Here they will discuss “ten thousand things” with other pilgrims and eventually create an artistic record of the project with creative writings and photographs. 

 

Eleanor Gilmore-Szott 

Bioethics an Odyssey: Understanding Applications of Bioethics in a Hospital Setting 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Chris Campolo 

 

“Bioethics is a unique field of applied ethics because it is truly a hybrid between the theoretical and patient care,” said Eleanor Gilmore-Szott. To build an understanding of bioethics in patient care in hospital settings, she will conduct interviews at public and private hospitals.  She also plans to learn more about bioethics through observing ethics committee meetings, reviewing literature, and shadowing bioethicists.  In addition, she’ll learn more about the role of ethics committees and their influence on policy, education, clinical practice and research. 

 

Samantha Gullion 

Alienation in the Needle 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Prof. Maxine Payne 

 

Samantha Gullion will explore the concept of tattooing from both a sociological and an artistic perspective this summer. She will visit well-known parlors in Miami and Los Angeles to determine what motivates artists to choose the profession and the reasons clients get tattoos.  “By utilizing participant-observation, I wish to find answers to the overarching question:  what drives people to choose this sub-culture when it could alienate them from mainstream culture, especially job markets,” Gullion said. With interviews on both coasts, she will be able to see if there are differences between them and the research she has already conducted in Arkansas. Eventually, she will exhibit a photo-essay about tattooing and the people she meets. 

 

Eli Harpst 

IDASA: An Experience with Democracy Advocacy 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Anne Goldberg 

 

Eli Harpst will be the first Hendrix student to volunteer with the democracy advocacy group IDASA, the Institute for Democracy in South Africa, in Cape Town. IDASA is an independent public interest organization that promotes sustainable democracy in South Africa through building democratic institutions, educating citizens and advocating for social justice.  “Democracy is never completely done or instituted, but is constantly evolving or devolving,” Harpst said. He will learn how IDASA helps facilitate good governance by conducting research on public policy, social issues and legislation and by working on a radio project to promote accurate information and political participation on local community stations. 

 

Karl Heinbockel 

Delta Garden Study 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Joyce Hardin 

 

The Delta Garden Study is a USDA-funded project that creates school gardens and studies their impact. It is also designed to prevent childhood obesity and social risk factors and improve academic achievement for middle school children in the Delta and Central regions of Arkansas. The study supports the “Farm to School” effort to provide fresh, locally grown produce to schools.  Karl Heinbockel will serve as an intern with the Delta Garden Study this summer.  “Being able to participate in this internship is important to me because this study is addressing important issues – obesity, school performance, environmental degradation, and global warming,” he said. If it’s successful, it similar programs could be developed across the country. 

 

Allison Henry 

Determining the Existence of a Sphincter in the Caval Region of Stenella coeruleoalba 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

Sponsor: Dr. Jennifer Dearolf 

 

Allison Henry will conduct research on the striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba, to see if it has a sphincter in the caval region of its diaphragm—a sphincter in this location can be used by the dolphin to restrict blood flow.  This can be useful when the dolphin dives. “The existence of a caval sphincter in striped dolphins would suggest the animals dive deeply, and thus lead to future, more advanced analyses of their ventilatory and circulatory systems,” Henry said.  

 

Tom Holt and Cassie Zhang 

Tightly-Knit Communities: Tibetan Buddhism in the USA and Tibet 

Category: Global Awareness 

Sponsor: Dr. Jay McDaniel 

 

Tom Holt and Cassie Zhang have become interested in Tibetan culture as it relates to Buddhism. “Our objective is to more deeply understand and appreciate the Tibetan community and its spiritual environment through face-to-face encounters in San Francisco, New York City, and Tibet itself,” they said. In America, their places of interest range from meditation centers and gathering places to museums and specialized libraries. In Tibet, they will visit pilgrimage sites, gathering places, monasteries and the Dalai Lama’s former palace. They will compare their observations of these communities with depictions of Tibet in popular works. 

 

Natasha Honomichl 

Knitting for Cancer 

Category: Service to the World 

Sponsor: Dr. George Harper 

 

Drawing on her six years of experience with knit and crochet, Natasha Honomichl will spend the summer crafting hats to donate to the cancer patients at Arkansas Children’s Hospital in Little Rock.  She hopes to create at least 18 of varying sizes, ranging from infant to child to adult.  Many patients at the hospital have undergone chemotherapy, resulting in a loss of hair. A homemade hat can help keep them warm and improve their self-esteem. “This project will enrich me spiritually by allowing me to help others in a way best suited to my abilities,” she said. 

 

Courtney Johnson 

Exploring Documentary Photography 

Category: Artistic Creativity 

Sponsor: Prof. Maxine Payne 

 

Photographer Courtney Johnson will attend a workshop on documentary photography at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass, Colo. She will learn more about the techniques needed to create photography that tells a story, either about an environment or social and cultural issues. “I will investigate the process of creating a photographic project from initial conception, to creation, and distribution—including exhibits, books, and internet multimedia,” Johnson said. 

 

Trey Kalbaugh 

Internship in Dentistry 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. David Hales 

 

Trey Kalbaugh is facing a difficult choice—he needs to decide if he will be a dentist, orthodontist, or oral surgeon. To help narrow things down, he will have an internship with a local dentist near his hometown.  By working alongside the dentist, Kalbaugh will learn more about the profession on a day-to-day basis. “Out of this internship, I want to confirm if this is the career path for me or if I need to turn my sights onto more specialized dentistry,” he said. 

 

Amara Kearney 

Exploring Agricultural Preservation in Social Context 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Stella Capek 

 

Amara Kearney will be an intern for an organization focused on the fields of food and agriculture and their relationship with cultural, environmental and political factors. “An internship in this field would both help to form a comprehensive view on the global food system’s effect on the environment and people, as well as to help cultivate solutions and movement toward a changed society,” Kearney said. She will draw on her interest in science, sociology and the sustainable food movement to explore how agriculture relates to human identity. 

 

Karrah Kehus 

Internship at Gulf Coast Research Lab 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Jennifer Dearolf 

 

Growing up on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi gave Karrah Kehus a passion for marine biology. She will take that interest to the next level this summer with an internship at the Gulf Coast Research Lab in Ocean Springs, Miss. She will work with faculty in their labs where she will learn about marine botany, toxicology, parasitology, and aquaculture as well as participate in a separate lab dealing with sharks.  “This internship will help me professionally by giving me the opportunity to experience different fields of marine biology,” Kehus said. 

 

Karyn Kuan and Johnny English 

The Camino de Santiago Compostela: A Modern Pilgrimage on the Path for Enlightenment 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Peg Falls-Corbitt 

and 

Sierra McCabe and Jennifer Zilly 

El Camino de Santiago 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Andrea Newsom 

 

Two pairs of Hendrix students will walk the historic Camino de Santiago Compostela in Spain this summer. The Camino has existed as a Christian pilgrimage for more than 1,000 years as travelers journey to the cathedral in northwestern Spain where legend says Saint James is buried. From the demanding physical task and conversations with other pilgrims, Karyn Kuan and Johnny English hope to develop “our awareness of ourselves and the lessons of the Camino.” Sierra McCabe and Jennifer Zilly have an objective “to meditate on our past experiences and spiritual growth in order to discern the paths we will take once we graduate from Hendrix.” 

 

Kelley Lane 

Empowering Women in Nepal 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Bill Gorvine 

 

The Red Sari is a business in Nepal that offers the opportunity for women to have financial independence. Local women handcraft items for sale on the global market using traditional artistic methods. Kelley Lane will travel to Nepal with Julie West, founder of The Red Sari, to assist with the business and learn about women’s issues in the country. “Not only will I be able to see how the business has changes the lives of Nepalese women, but also I expect to be changed by seeing the lives of these women,” Lane said. 

 

Kendall Lewellen 

Women’s Empowerment through Literacy and Vocational Training in Rabat, Morocco 

Category: Service to the World 

Sponsor: Dr. Carol West 

 

“The role of women in Islamic culture is oftentimes rife with misunderstanding, which leads me to believe that cultural immersion is necessary for any valid perspective on the topic to be possible,” Kendall Lewellan said. She will spend three weeks volunteering with Cross-Cultural Solution’s program in Rabat, Morocco, which fights illiteracy and poverty among women.  She hopes to assist with literacy and economic self-sufficiency for women while gaining an understanding of the female condition in Northern Africa and Islamic society. 

 

Marissa Moyer and Amethyst Schmued 

Cross-Cultural Comparison of Environmental Consciousness and Public Policy 

Category: Global Awareness 

Sponsor: Dr. Anne Goldberg 

 

Marissa Moyer and Amethyst Schmued will do a cross-cultural comparison of environmental consciousness and public policy between England, Germany and the United States this summer. England has a long history of industrial pollution problems while German is a leader in environmental conservation efforts. They will visit museums and significant sites, interview contacts, and conduct participant observation. “By observing the people and industries of each country, we will further our understanding of the effect of public policy on environmental consciousness,” they said. 

 

Didier Muvandimwe 

Physics and Computer Science Lab Assisting in High School in Rwanda 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Todd Tinsley 

 

In Rwanda, a national exam determines whether high school students are eligible for scholarships and loans from the government for post-secondary education, with higher scores making financial support more likely. Didier Muvandimwe, who was a scholarship recipient himself, will return to Rwanda this summer to tutor students at two schools to prepare them for the exam. “I will be mainly working in a physics lab and a computer science lab,” he said. He will share his academic skills while helping improve the students’ English. 

 

Safia Nawaz 

Broadway: Calling All Strong Female Protagonists 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Lisa Leitz 

 

Safia Nawaz will conduct a study of the portrayal of heroines in five Broadway productions to explore how gender issues are depicted on stage.  She will assess the role of the female lead, the relationships between her and other characters, how she presents herself during times when she is alone on stage, and the audience reaction to her.  “These factors will help me determine what effect Broadway has on its audience members and what messages they take away from the plays based on the heroine’s character/personality/actions,” Nawaz said. This project was underwritten by the generous support of the Hendrix Murphy Foundation Programs in Literature and Language. 

 

Ezra Neal and Quinn Neal 

Ozark Medieval Fortress: A Castle in the Making 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Sasha Pfau 

 

Brothers Ezra and Quinn Neal will work at the Ozark Medieval Fortress, a new living history museum in Lead Hill, Ark. Using only the methods, techniques and technologies available to people of the Middle Ages, they will help with the construction of a medieval European castle.  At the time, such castles were the epitome of the defensive structure. “The often took many years and an exemplary amount of effort  and resources to construct,” they said. Their hands-on work will give them a perspective on the efforts of the peasant class who built the structures and the conditions they endured. 

 

Genevieve Nesom 

A Pull Towards Wholeness: A Jungian Approach to a Relationship with the Soul, Self and World 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Amanda Moore 

 

Genevieve Nesom will conclude a year-long independent study of the theories of psychotherapist Carl Jung by attending a two-week long conference in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. “The speakers at the conference include authors whom I have used as pillars for research and also scholars, including a Hendrix graduate, who are my professional role models,” Nesom said. This is the 26th annual Jung Conference, and this year the focus is Jung’s influence on spirituality. Nesom will attend lectures, seminars, and workshops led by many of Switzerland’s top Jungian scholars. 

 

Jessica Nicholls and Lauren Bowden 

A Buddhist Appreciation in a Catholic Context: Examining Interfaith Dialogue in Mexico 

Category: Global Awareness 

Sponsor: Dr. Bill Gorvine 

 

Mexico is the second most Catholic nation in the world, yet it is home to Casa Tibet, one of only six Tibetan Buddhist Centers in the world established by the Dalai Lama to preserve his nation’s culture.  Jessica Nicholls and Lauren Bowden will visit Mexico City and Guadalajara to examine how Buddhism weaves into these predominately Catholic cities. The project will investigate “the chance Tibetan Buddhism stands to take root in the West, especially within environments with a longstanding religious history, they said. 

 

Anna Nyseth 

Brentwood United Methodist Church Youth Choirs Professional Field Experience 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Nancy Fleming 

 

As a vocal music major, Anna Nyseth knows that she would like to direct choirs someday. This summer, she’ll have to opportunity to assist with the youth choirs of Brentwood United Methodist Church in Brentwood, Tenn. The Jubilation Choir, comprised of 7th-9th graders, will go on tour to Cincinnati and Dayton, Ohio, while the high school aged Sonshine Choir will go to Toronto, Canada.  “I’ll experience more than just the musical aspects of leading choirs; I’ll get a better understanding of the organizational and disciplinary aspects of leading large youth choirs of different age groups,” Nyseth said. 

 

Christopher Ogle 

Summer in Korea 

Category: Global Awareness 

Sponsor: Dr. Peg Falls-Corbitt 

 

Christopher Ogle will spend the summer in Korea, learning the language and immersing himself in the culture while living in an apartment in Seoul. During his high school year, he became friends with several exchange students from the country and plans to travel the country to visit their hometowns. “It is because of these unique friendships that I will not only be able to experience life in Seoul, but other cities on the Korean peninsula as well,” Ogle said. This project was underwritten by the generous support of the Hendrix Murphy Foundation Programs in Literature and Language. 

 

Paul Ortiz 

Construction in Guatemala 

Category: Service to the World 

Sponsor: Rev. J. J. Whitney 

 

For Paul Ortiz, his upcoming mission trip to Guatemala with God’s Child Project has a special meaning.  He will be reuniting with three of his friends who were part of the Senior High Youth Group at his church. “All of us going have traveled together and worked on similar projects together. For me, it is important to be able to return to do service work with old friends,” Ortiz said. This time, as a Spanish major, he will also be able to improve his language skills and communicate with local project supervisors during their mission trip. 

 

Jacob Porter 

Examining United States Foreign Policy 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Al Eastham 

 

This summer, Jacob Porter will travel to our nation’s capital to take a deep look at American foreign policy with national experts. He’ll attend the 2011 Osgood Summer Symposium where he will explore topics ranging from arms control diplomacy to American relations with China, the Middle East and Russia. “By attending lectures from foreign policy experts, visiting landmarks in Washington, and discoursing with foreign students, I will get a look at U. S. foreign policy from many viewpoints,” Porter said. 

 

Ashley Redo 

Shadowing a Veterinarian 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Jennifer Dearolf 

 

Preparing herself for the competitive application process for veterinary school, Ashley Redo will gain experience by spending time with a licensed veterinarian this summer. She will sit in on regular check-ups as well as observe more complex surgeries like spaying, neutering or tumor removal.  “Being able to observe a veterinarian as well as participate in routine checkups will be a great asset to me before I delve into four years of veterinary school,” Redo said. 

 

Josi Robertson 

The Roles of the Diaphragm and Scalenus in the Ventilation of Striped Dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

Sponsor: Dr. Jennifer Dearolf 

 

Josi Robertson will analyze the fiber-type profiles of both the scalenus and diaphragm of striped dolphins to determine if these muscles work together or independently from one another. Her goal is to assess the role they play in the dolphin’s breathing, especially how this compares to the bottlenose dolphins. “This research could provide further data to help understand the ventilatory and potential evolutionary relationships between dolphin species, Robertson said. 

 

Kirk Rodriguez 

Working HandsOn in New Orleans 

Category: Service to the World 

Sponsor: Dr. Wayne Oudekerk 

 

In New Orleans, 23% of the population lives below the poverty line. To help those in need in the city, Kirk Rodriguez will spend two months this summer doing volunteer work with HandsOn New Orleans. “Such work will include Habitat for Humanity builds, environmentally minded endeavors with The Green Project, working closely with the houseless at the New Orleans Mission, or getting my hands dirty in community gardens directly through HandsOn New Orleans,” Rodriguez said. 

 

Leala Rosen 

Teachings Program Summer Intern at the Dallas Museum of Art 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Kristi McKim 

 

For the past three years, Leala Rosen has volunteered as a teen docent at the Dallas Museum of Art, giving tours to visitors. Part of her duties this summer as an intern is to supervise the teen docents. She will also prepare art activity supplies for outreach programs. “I’m minoring in Art History, and I’m interested in working for a non-profit organization. Working as a summer intern at the Dallas Museum of Art would allow me to combine those interests and gain firsthand career experience,” Rosen said. 

 

Brittany Ross 

"WWOOFing" in Kenya 

Category: Global Awareness 

Sponsor: Dr. Carol West 

 

For two months this summer, Brittany Ross will live with families in Kenya through World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF). “Through this I will learn first-hand about organic growing techniques and living sustainable without the use of heavy machinery,” Ross said. WWOOFing is an exchange system in which hosts offer a place to stay and food for volunteers who work on their organic farms. She also hopes to learn how individuals are affected by the country’s political and cultural issues, particularly corruption and bribery. 

 

Sara Samuelson 

Hats for the Homeless 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Leslie Zorwick 

 

Sara Samuelson has a goal of creating 100 hats this summer. Her artistic endeavors with yarn, needles and looms form a service project that will help those in need. “Half of the hats will be donated to the Immanuel Lutheran Church of St. Louis to give to the homeless and the other half will be sold at the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life,” she said.  The proceeds will help the organization promote the awareness of cancer and support those with the disease.  

 

Dorothy Schuler 

Discovering Therapeutic Targets in the Treatment of Huntington’s Disease 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

Sponsor: Dr. Andres Caro 

 

Huntington’s Disease is a genetic disorder that diminishes an individual’s ability to walk, talk, and reason. Dorothy Schuler will be a research assistant under Dr. Mark Diamond at Washington University in St. Louis as he conducts experiments focused on developing therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington’s. “This research is tremendously important as any finding could lead to a better treatment or even a cure,” Schuler said. 

 

Jennifer Shostrand 

Women in India: A Cultural Immersion and Study of Indian Marriage 

Category: Global Awareness 

Sponsor: Dr. Sarah Lee 

 

Through Volunteering India, Jennifer Shostrand will be working with the Society for Promotion of Women and Children, which runs a women’s center in the heart of Delhi. One goal of the center is vocational training for disadvantaged women who are trying to become self-reliant. While in the country, she hopes to learn more about the women and their lives, especially arranged marriages. “I will explore the correlation between status and marriage, and how women view the marriage process,” Shostrand said.  

 

Anna Smith 

More than Crossing Paths: Assisting Refugees and Immigrants in Mid-Missouri 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Lisa Leitz 

 

Anna Smith will get a look at the field of immigration services interning at the office of Refugee and Immigration Services of the Catholic Diocese of Jefferson City, Mo. “I plan on spending my career assisting individuals who are undergoing a transition between cultures—whether they are immigrants, refugees, exchange students, or others,” Smith said. She hopes to not only cross paths with those in need this summer but also to be a positive force for each one. 

 

Lauren Thorburg 

Language and Revision: A Professional Field Experience at Concordia Publishing House 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Dr. Dorian Stuber 

 

“Editing inspires me because you are able to take a work and shape it; you are able to improve the foundation and make it stronger,” Lauren Thorburg said.  She plans to build on this interest working at Concordia Publishing House, which is the publishing house of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. She will work with the staff to review manuscripts, searching for grammatical, doctrinal, and educational errors in materials for middle school age children. This project was underwritten by the generous support of the Hendrix Murphy Foundation Programs in Literature and Language. 

 

Charles Wallace 

Filming an Interdisciplinary Capstone 

Category: Special Projects 

Sponsor: Dr. Kristi McKim 

 

Lights! Camera! Action! Charles Wallace will direct and edit his own full-length film, which will take place on the road between Dallas and Los Angeles. He will use his filmmaking and film theory knowledge to create his movie. “I am very excited to follow all of the steps and procedures in producing a feature-length film, and I know that this experience will ready me for what I can expect in the filmmaking industry in my life after college,” Wallace said. He will show the film on campus when it is completed. This project was underwritten by the generous support of the Hendrix Murphy Foundation Programs in Literature and Language. 

 

Caley Zuzula 

San Antonio Zoo Internship 

Category: Professional and Leadership Development 

Sponsor: Leigh Lassiter-Counts 

 

Caley Zuzula has been a frequent visitor at the San Antonio Zoo, and this summer she will get a taste of life behind the scenes as an intern. “Working at a zoo has always been a dream of mine, and I believe that it will help me get a better grasp at what I may like to pursue as a career,” she said.  Her tasks will include taking care of primates, maintaining their habitats, or preparing their food.  

 

Dr. Chris Campolo 

Excavating Roman Ruins in Portugal 

Category: Special Projects 

 

“Standing in a recently excavated Roman watchtower, uncovering a long-buried Latin inscription, or puzzling over tools found in an ancient workshop can wonderfully complement what we learn by reading ancient texts,” Dr. Chris Campolo said. He will accompany six students to the Caladhino Archeology Project’s excavation of a Roman watchtower near the town of Redondo, Portugal, this summer.  David Aspesi, Georgia Cooley, Benjamin Edmonds, Patrick Keen, Connor Kempton, and Lisa Wilkerson will learn archeological excavation, surveying, and the proper handling of artifacts. 

 

Dr. Andres Caro 

Mechanisms of Alcohol-Induced Liver Damage in-vivo 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

 

Dr. Andres Caro will work with Sarah Thompson, Etienne Nzabarushimana, Logan Rice, Lilly Moncrief, Sam Crocker and Gracie Kloss this summer. They are focusing their research on the mechanisms and effects of alcohol-induced liver injury on the molecular level.  

 

Dr. Bob Dunn 

Using Ring Lasers to Monitor Infrasound and Ground Motion from Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Hurricanes 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

 

Pierre Urisanga, a physics student who is a native of Rwanda, will conduct research with Dr. Bob Dunn using the ring laser at Hendrix. First, he will upgrade the equipment to allow it to measure rotation on a north-south axis in addition to the vertical axis. Second, he will record and model the responses from the ring laser as it senses motion in the ground from events such as earthquakes, volcanoes and hurricanes.  

 

Dr. Tom Goodwin 

Three Chemistry Projects 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

 

Dr. Tom Goodwin will collaborate with and supervise three students as they conduct chemistry research projects. Each student will plan and carry out a project, with Nick Heathscott focusing on anti-coagulant drug synthesis, Lolly Plummer on green chemistry experiments, and Qin Yin on mammalian chemical communication. 

 

Dr. Liz Gron 

Ridin’ Dirty with Science, 2011 

Category: Special Projects/Service to the World 

 

Celebrating its fifth anniversary, “Ridin’ Dirty with Science” is an outreach program offered in conjunction with the Boys and Girls Club of Faulkner County that engages local middle school students in fun, interesting, and interactive experiments to bring basic chemistry, biology and physics principles to life. Hendrix students volunteer their time to teach the students through cutting-edge experiments designed to spark an interest in the sciences.  For example, “What’s in There” will involve students collecting environmental samples (bug eggs, algae, “living water”) and using a microscope to really see what's in there. There will be two, two-day lab sessions at Hendrix. This year’s five student leaders will work with 25 other student volunteers to run the program. 

 

Dr. Courtney Hatch 

The impact of atmospheric mineral aerosol ocean deposition on phytoplankton growth rates: A combined iron dissolution and biomarker study 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

 

Dr. Courtney Hatch and Meredith Miles will use a multidimensional approach to study the effects of clay mineral deposition on micronutrient availability and phytoplankton growth in the ocean. They will pay particular attention to the presence of iron.  

 

Dr. Brett Hill 

Archaeology and the Rise of Human Culture in France 

Category: Global Awareness 

 

Dr. Brett Hill will take Seth Boren, Robin Brown, Victoria Garrett, and Mariah Nehus on a tour of human history, ranging from the beginnings of artistic expression in Paleolithic cave art to capitalism in fortified medieval cities. They will visit museums, archaeological digs, and Roman ruins in France as they explore the long-term processes of culture change. 

 

Dr. Lisa Leitz 

Assessing the Needs of Arkansas Military Veterans: Barriers to Benefits 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

 

Dr. Lisa Leitz will work with Benjamin Thomas and Allison Pope to interview Arkansas veterans about their reintegration into civilian life and their use of military benefits. They will explore their use of medical, psychological, educational and other benefits along with any social or cultural barriers to benefit use, including examining stigmas associated with medical healthcare in the military.  

 

Dr. Christopher Marvin 

Development of Photoredox Methods: A Green Chemistry Approach to Synthesize Biologically Active Natural Products 

Category: Undergraduate Research 

 

Udai Garimella, Brandi Gist, and Cheryl Mathis will work with Dr. Chris Marvin developing new organic chemistry reactions. They will research ways to harness light energy to form new carbon-carbon bonds using metal catalysts. This reaction methodology will be used to synthesize biologically active small molecules. In particular, they are interested in molecules that target the delta-opioid and nicotinic receptors in the brain, which may hold promise for treating chronic pain.