Academic Affairs

2010-2011 New Courses

Almost all the courses that appear in the Schedule of Classes have course descriptions that can be found in the Hendrix Catalog.  There are two types of courses that do not appear in the Catalog:

  • New sections of courses appearing in the Catalog as Topics Courses.
  • New courses that have been approved by the faculty and administration since the last Catalog was printed.  


All of these types of courses that appear in the
Schedule of Classes for 2010-2011 are listed below.

Course descriptions will be added as they become available.

Please contact the appropriate Department Chair
for more information about a particular course.



AMST/HIST 115:  Introduction to American Studies:  This course provides students with an overview of the field of American Studies and an inquiry into the nature of American identity. It will examine the Cold War era origins of American Studies and the field’s later attempts to study all aspects of the American experience. The course also explores the many disciplinary approaches and methodologies, social movements, cultural ideas, and theoretical paradigms that have shaped the field. In the end, students will appreciate the way an inter-disciplinary approach and an openness regarding methodology have allowed American Studies to engage critical and timely questions of society, culture, and politics in an interesting and enlightening fashion.  New temporary course

ANTH 270:  Human Behavioral Ecology:  Human Behavioral Ecology applies evolutionary theory to understanding and analyzing the range of human economic, reproductive and social behavior within ecological limitations. This bio-cultural approach to human behavior has been applied to diverse social issues such as child labor, teen pregnancy, polygamy, parental investment, cooperation, resource use and conservation. New temporary course

ANTH/POLI 327:  Human Rights and Social Justice in Latin America:  This course will examine the social and political contexts of human rights and social justice in Latin America. Particular emphasis will be on Argentina and Chile, though Latin America as a whole will be considered. Topics such as the era of military juntas, truth and reconciliation efforts, indigenous rights, and gender in social movements will be included.  New temporary course

ARTH/PHIL 389:  Aesthetics and Contemporary Art:  An introduction to aesthetics as a theoretical discipline in its own right, a discipline concerned with the nature of representation and thus with beauty and art. The course will focus in particular on issues of aesthetics and visual representation; the relationship between visual arts, literature, and other art forms; the efficacy of aesthetic theory as a mode of reading and interpretation.  We will explore these issues in relation to specific works of visual art, film, and literature.  Texts by, among others, Kant, Hegel, Schlegel, Freud, Kafka, Adorno, Benjamin, Derrida, and Sontag. New permanent course

ARTS 490 C1:  Special Topics:  Printmaking Mixed Media:  This course is intended as a second-level printmaking class for those students who have taken Woodcut or Etching. (First-time printmaking students admitted with consent of instructor.) Focusing on alternative methods and materials, students will learn new ways to expand their imagery and develop a personal vision. Techniques will include drawing and painting into prints, monoprint, monotype, stencils, litho transfer, collagraph and collage. Emphasis is on experimentation.

ARTS 490 D1:  Special Topics:  Alternative Photographic Processes

ARTS 490 E1:  Special Topics:  Drawing for Personal Vision:In this course students will work in a variety of media on paper to develop themselves as artists. Through directed conversations with the class and instructor, students will create projects that express ideas in visual terms. Prerequisites: Freehand Drawing and one other studio course.

BIOL 100:  Concepts in Biology:  Plants and People

BIOL 101:  Concepts in Biology:  Plants and People (with lab):  The variety of organisms and ecosystems of a particular region and how they originated and have changed throughout time. Special emphasis on the geological and biological history of the selected region, as well as the human history and contemporary environmental issues of that region. Field laboratories expose students to the regional geology, ecosystems, and the major taxonomic groups of organisms. Course is taught away from the college campus in the region specified by the course section subtitle. Students who take this course cannot also receive credit for BIOL 102 Natural History or BIOL 106 Neotropical Biology.  New permanent course

BIOL 330:  Plant Systematics (with lab): Classification of vascular plants and current methods of phylogenetic inference. Field collections will emphasize the flora of Arkansas; laboratory analyses will focus on morphological features of plant families; and lectures will address major themes in the evolution of vascular plants. New permanent course

BIOL 335:  Marine Biology (with lab):  Studies of marine organisms and their environment, with a focus on barrier islands, estuaries, mangroves, seagrass beds, or coral reefs, depending on the destination of the research trip. To observe marine organisms and their environment, students will travel to a destination that will be determined each year the course is taught. Possible destinations include: the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL) in Ocean Springs, MS, the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, and Calabash Caye Field Station in Belize. This trip entails an additional cost to the student. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 220. New permanent course

BIOL 465:  Molecular Evolution and Bioinformatics (with lab):  Evolutionary processes acting at the molecular level, and the utilization of molecular patterns to reconstruct the evolutionary history of genes, genomes, populations and species. The laboratory will focus on using sequence data to complete an intensive semester long research project in phylogenetics, protein structure and function modeling or other Bioinformatics topics. Laboratory course. Prerequisite: BIOL 250. New permanent course

BUSI 340:  The Law and Entrepreneurs:  The course explores legal and practical issues related to entrepreneurs starting and owning a business, including topics such as: leaving your current job; organizing as a corporation, partnership or LLC; financing the business; relating with coowners, other management and employees; buying or leasing business property; insurance issues; business contracts and collection issues; and ecommerce and current business topics. Enrollment is open to all majors. New permanent course

CHEM/EVST 280:  Environmental Analysis (with lab):  Study of environmental chemistry will be united with the practical analytical methods necessary to understand and analyze environmental systems. Chemical cycles of the atmosphere, soil and water will be studied in class while effective sampling, preparation, and modern analysis methods are learned in the laboratory.  New permanent course

CHIN 150:  An Introduction to Chinese Culture: This course introduces students to various aspecs of traditional Chinese culture: food, literature, folk sayings, language, music, and the arts. It also introduces students to aspects of daily life in contemporary China, particularly as found in northeast China. The course, available to students from all classes, combines reading and reflection with hands-on experiences such as preparing Chinese food, learning to write calligraphy, and creating paper arts. New temporary course

CLAS 490 A1:  Topics:  Myth and Children’s Literature:  This course will analyze the ways in which Greek and Roman mythology has been presented to young audiences.  We will consider how ancient stories are reshaped for children, the purposes which such mythological tales serve, and the cultural trends which they may reflect.  To that end, we will survey interesting and influential mythological compendia published from the mid-nineteenth century through the present day.  Students will also have the opportunity to develop their own rendition of a classical mythological story. (no prerequisite; fulfills LS and W2.)

ECON 425:  Meta-Analysis of Research:  Meta-analysis provides an objective, statistical approach to understand and integrate scientific research. Meta-analysis is widely used by medical researchers and social scientists to makes sense of the disparate results routinely reported from clinical trials, experiments and observational research. Basic statistics and regression analysis are used to summarize and to explain empirical research.  New temporary course

EDUC 400 A1:  Topics:  Closing the Achievement Gap:  Is closing the achievement gap between black and white students the greatest civil rights issue of our time? A problem-based learning module will be used to examine the educational policies used by the Bush administration and proposed by the Obama administration to close the achievement gap by 2013-2014.  Problem-based learning (PBL) fosters the transfer of knowledge and merges theory with practice by applying research to authentic problems and settings. The course will examine policies and best practices on the national and state levels.  It will conclude with the design of a policy paper for legislative and executive officials on the national and state levels.

ENGC/SOCI 306:  Creative Writing:  Exploring Nature:  Students are invited to explore what nature means as an idea and an experience, and to arrive at an enriched understanding of their own relationship to nature through creative writing. To represent the range and variety of what has come to be known as nature writing, readings include selected examples from literature (particularly creative nonfiction essays, with some fiction and poetry) and sociology (sociological essays and articles on topics such as environmental justice, nature and identity, and the significance of place). The primary emphasis of the course is on creative writing and attentiveness to form and purpose in an interdisciplinary context.  New permanent course


 

ENGC 497:  Creative Writing:  Senior Thesis Seminar :  Limited to senior English Majors with a Creative Writing Emphasis, this spring semester seminar course focuses on students’ independent writing projects. Departmental faculty and seminar members will provide input and critiques as each student works toward a creative manuscript and a critical essay addressing narrative strategies or poetics. The project will be defended orally. Student must have a second reader (not necessarily an English Department member) in addition to the ENGC 497 instructor; students must receive project idea approval by Fall Break of the senior year. The instructor and the second reader will consult to determine the student’s grade.  New permanent course

ENGL 330:  Modern American Poetry

ENGL 490 C1:  Topics:  Freud, Nabokov, Sebald

ENGL 460 A1:  Topics in American Literature:  Zora Neale Hurston

EVST/CHEM 280:  Environmental Analysis (with lab):  Study of environmental chemistry will be united with the practical analytical methods necessary to understand and analyze environmental systems. Chemical cycles of the atmosphere, soil and water will be studied in class while effective sampling, preparation, and modern analysis methods are learned in the laboratory.  New permanent course

HIST/AMST 115:  Introduction to American Studies:  This course provides students with an overview of the field of American Studies and an inquiry into the nature of American identity. It will examine the Cold War era origins of American Studies and the field’s later attempts to study all aspects of the American experience. The course also explores the many disciplinary approaches and methodologies, social movements, cultural ideas, and theoretical paradigms that have shaped the field. In the end, students will appreciate the way an inter-disciplinary approach and an openness regarding methodology have allowed American Studies to engage critical and timely questions of society, culture, and politics in an interesting and enlightening fashion.  New temporary course

HIST 317:  Crusades and Contact

HIST 228:  The Medieval Islamic World

KINE 225:  Controversial Issues in Health (New temporary course)

KINE 265:  Theory of Health Behavior (New temporary course)

KINE 235:  Foundations of Public Health  (New temporary course)

KINE 285:  Community Health  (New temporary course)

KINE 340:  Epidemiology  (New temporary course)

LATI 390 C1:  Topics:  Martial:  This course will focus on the translation and analysis of Martial's poetry.  In addition to reading and interpreting selections from his epigrams and his poems about the Roman games, we will consider recent scholarly studies of Martial's work.  (prerequisite Latin 210 or permission of the instructor; fulfills LS)

LATI 390 D1:  Topics:  Sallust:  In this course we will read Sallust's Bellum Catilinae.  Aside from an emphasis on improving one's ability to read Latin prose, the focus of the course will be largely historiographic.  We will consider the following questions, among others: What is Sallust's view of Rome's past? How does he present Catiline as an enemy of Rome?  What is his view of the Rome of his time?  How does his position as an eyewitness historian affect our view of his account of Catiline's conspiracy?  Assignments will include translation exams and interpretative essays.  (prerequisite Latin 210 or permission of the instructor; fulfills LS)

 MATH 490 A1: Topics: Intro to Order and Lattices:  The notions of order, lattices and Boolean algebras are close to the core of many areas of mathematics, including (but not restricted to) algebra, analysis, and logic, as well as to computer science. This course is an introduction to partially ordered sets and lattices. The prerequisite is Introduction to Advanced Mathematics (MATH 290) or equivalent background.

PHIL 200 B1:  Special Focus:  The Philosophy of Sex:  A philosophical study of the phenomena, concepts, ethics, and significance of sex.  We will explore topics ranging from the ontological status of gender to feminist debates over the import of pornography and prostitution.  We will discuss, for example, the relationships we find in our world between sex and love, class, identity, violence, family, technology, health, and money.  We will explore a variety of philosophical theories about sex, from Plato onward.

PHIL 200 C1:  Special Focus:  Scottish Moral Philosophy:  The study and critical evaluation of the ethical thought of some of the leading philosophers of eighteenth-century Scotland, including Francis Hutcheson, David Hume, and Adam Smith.

PHIL/ARTH 389:  Aesthetics and Contemporary Art:  An introduction to aesthetics as a theoretical discipline in its own right, a discipline concerned with the nature of representation and thus with beauty and art. The course will focus in particular on issues of aesthetics and visual representation; the relationship between visual arts, literature, and other art forms; the efficacy of aesthetic theory as a mode of reading and interpretation.  We will explore these issues in relation to specific works of visual art, film, and literature.  Texts by, among others, Kant, Hegel, Schlegel, Freud, Kafka, Adorno, Benjamin, Derrida, and Sontag. New permanent course

PHIL 490 C1:  Topics:  Pragmatism:  Through essays by Charles Sanders Peirce and William James classical American pragmatism will be introduced. The majority of the course will focus on John Dewey’s pragmatism. We will study Dewey’s Experience and Nature. To complement this reading we will look at some passages from The Quest for Certainty and Logic: The Theory of Inquiry. Of Experience and Nature Richard Rorty stated in Consequence of Pragmatism, “It is easier to think of the book as an explanation of why nobody needs a metaphysics, rather than as itself a metaphysics.”  Time permitting we will finish by looking at the Rorty’s sense of pragmatism.

PHIL 490 K1:  Topics:  The Philosophy of Oakeshott:  A close investigation into the political and moral philosophy of Michael Oakeshott, one of the most subtle and idiosyncratic philosophers of the Twentieth Century.  

POLI 100:  Issues in Politics:  Race and Ethnicity:  The substantive theme of the course is politics of race and ethnicity in the United States and abroad.  This course will include sections that focus on political theory, comparative politics, and international relations in the spirit of the first objective of Issues courses.  The variety of topics covered during the semester should give you insights into a number of key issues surrounding the politics and policy consequences of race and ethnicity in the U.S. and abroad.  This course should also prepare you for additional study of the politics of race and ethnicity and political phenomena more generally.

POLI 224:  Family Law and Public Policy:  This course will explore the historical development of laws and public policies that affect families.  This course will include sections that focus on the impact of government laws, policies, and programs on family life.  The variety of topics covered during the semester will further address marriage, divorce, parenting, and children.  This course will conclude with a comparison of U.S. family policy to selected countries around the world.  New temporary course

POLI/SOCI 226:  Social Deviance, Crime and Punishment:  The substantive theme of the course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control. This course will critically examine criminology, sociology, and legal theories that explain the cause of crime and other offenses that violate social norms.  The variety of topics covered during the semester will include street crimes, violent crimes, white-color crimes, occupational crimes, war crimes and torture.  This course will also look at the punishment of crimes, including, policing, prosecution, sentencing and mass incarceration.  This course should also give you insights into how crime and crime control impact social inequality around race, class, and gender.  New temporary course

POLI 320:  Criminal Law:  The substantive theme of the course is a generic study of Criminal Law in the United States.  This course will focus on topics that arise as we think about substantive criminal law.  The variety of topics covered during the semester will include the civil and criminal distinction, excuses, strict liability, attempts, and theory of punishment.  This course should give you insights into classic and contemporary works with emphasis on carefully working through the presented arguments in such readings.  New temporary course

POLI/ANTH 327:  Human Rights and Social Justice in Latin America:  This course will examine the social and political contexts of human rights and social justice in Latin America. Particular emphasis will be on Argentina and Chile, though Latin America as a whole will be considered. Topics such as the era of military juntas, truth and reconciliation efforts, indigenous rights, and gender in social movements will be included.  New temporary course

POLI 365 C1:  Topics:  Cultural and Political Economy:  This course introduces cultural ecology and political ecology, two related disciplines dedicated to the study of the relations between humans and their environment. Cultural ecology is a branch of cultural anthropology that studies the linkages between cultural and economic systems in traditional societies. Political ecology has widened the scope of this inquiry by adding in the study of the broader political economy within which these systems operate, with special emphasis on resource capture, social marginalization, and grassroots resistance. Combined, cultural and political ecology provides highly relevant insights about global environmental issues, especially regarding the articulation of the material and political causes of environmental degradation.

POLI 365 D1:  Topics:  Agriculture and Sustainability:  This course investigates the issue of sustainability with respect to agricultural systems. It studies the environmental and economic challenges faced by farmers worldwide, from deforestation in the Amazon to the overuse of chemical inputs in US or European agriculture. Emphasis will be on the political economy of world food production and land degradation rather than on agricultural techniques, although the latter will also be addressed. Students will acquire an understanding of the linkages between world hunger, the overproduction of food in rich countries, the “junk food invasion”, obesity, land degradation, and tropical deforestation.

POLI 365 E1:  Topics:  Policy Analysis:  Introduction to the basic tools and analytical techniques needed for the analysis of public policies. The course utilizes case studies to examine economic and non-economic approaches, including microeconomic reasoning, investment analysis, benefit-cost analysis, qualitative methods, and symbolic politics.

POLI 410 F1:  Topics:  Heideger and Arendt:  Martin Heidegger was in the process of writing Being and Time while Hannah Arendt studied with him in Germany. After a brief affair, Heidegger embraced National Socialism; Arendt fled Germany and abandoned philosophy in favor of political theory.  In this course, students will be introduced to the work of both Martin Heidegger and Hannah Arendt and will bring their work into conversation with one another. Moreover, it aims to bring philosophy and politics students into conversation with one another.  It hopes to improve philosophy students’ appreciation for politics by introducing them to the critical role political action plays for Arendt in the development of the self; while also improving politics students’ appreciation for philosophy by introducing them to the significant role ontology plays in the prospects of political engagement.

POLI 420 A1:  Topics:  Religion and Politics:  This course is designed to introduce students to the intricate and often complex link between religion and politics in the United States.  This includes examining the historical and contemporary effect of religion on various aspects of politics such as political culture, political behavior, and public policy.  We will focus particularly on the current political conflict between religious traditionalists on one hand and religious liberals and secular individuals on the other hand.  This conflict is often referred to as the ‘culture war’.  We will also explore the relationship between church and state, the politics of different religious and ethnic minority groups in the United States, and the potential impact of religion in future U.S. elections.  Finally, we will ask critical questions about the role of religion in American democracy throughout the semester.

POLI 430 A1:  Topics:  Financial Crashes and Complexity Economics:  This course will attempt to analyze and explain the causes and consequences of financial crashes throughout history, but with special emphasis on the 2008-09 crash we are still dealing with.  Unlike most mainstream analyses, though, the course will look to the emerging field of "Complexity Economics" (as opposed to neoclassical equilibrium/rational choice based economic models) for answers.  Complexity Economics draws upon such theoretical perspectives as Chaos Theory (nonlinearity), Complexity Theory, Complex Adaptive Systems, and Evolutionary Theory, all of which fundamentally challenge the mainstream version of social science (positivist/behavioralist) that has prevailed in Western society for the past several decades.

POLI 430 B1:  Topics:  South Asia:  This course will introduce students to the contemporary politics and international relations of South Asia.  Primary emphasis will be on India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, but it will also incorporate other countries in the region at least periodically.  The region's relations with the United States and other strong outside powers (People's Republic of China, Iran, Russia) will also receive attention.

PSYC 333:  Industrial-Organizational Psychology:  Students will learn how industrialorganizational psychologists help improve workplace fairness, enhance job satisfaction, and increase worker productivity. Topics will include employee selection, performance appraisal, organizational structure, workplace stress, and employee motivation.  New permanent course

RELI 280 B1:  Issues:  Asian Christianity

RELI 331:  Revelation and Resistance

RELI 332:  Concepts of God

RELI 460 A1:  Topics:  Postcolonial and Postmodern Theology

SOCI/POLI 226:  Social Deviance, Crime and Punishment:  The substantive theme of the course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control. This course will critically examine criminology, sociology, and legal theories that explain the cause of crime and other offenses that violate social norms.  The variety of topics covered during the semester will include street crimes, violent crimes, white-color crimes, occupational crimes, war crimes and torture.  This course will also look at the punishment of crimes, including, policing, prosecution, sentencing and mass incarceration.  This course should also give you insights into how crime and crime control impact social inequality around race, class, and gender.  New temporary course

SOCI 255:  Gender in Film and Television:  Gender is portrayed in and produced through film and television. The course will examine key concepts of gender by examining how masculinities and femininities are portrayed in film and television and shaped by categories of race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality. Students will be introduced to content analysis and use it to produce research about contemporary media trends.  New permanent course

SOCI/ENGC 306:  Creative Writing:  Exploring Nature:  Students are invited to explore what nature means as an idea and an experience, and to arrive at an enriched understanding of their own relationship to nature through creative writing. To represent the range and variety of what has come to be known as nature writing, readings include selected examples from literature (particularly creative nonfiction essays, with some fiction and poetry) and sociology (sociological essays and articles on topics such as environmental justice, nature and identity, and the significance of place). The primary emphasis of the course is on creative writing and attentiveness to form and purpose in an interdisciplinary context.  New permanent course

SOCI 380:  Social Contexts for Health and Healing

SPAN 485:  Gender and Power in Latin American Novels