• Fall 2016 Engaged Citizen Courses

  • LBST 150 A TEC: The Art and Science of Memory

    What are your most formative memories? How do those memories help you engage with your family, your friends, your community, and your world? How does technology (from taking photographs to looking up facts on the internet) shape the way you interact with those memories? Do you trust your memory more than external sources? This course will seek to contextualize these questions historically and psychologically, looking at medieval shifts in memory practices and asking important questions about the cognitive science of how memory works.

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    LBST 150 B TEC: Art & Spirit

    Listen to John Coltrane. Watch a Hendrix Players production. Spend an afternoon at Crystal Bridges Museum or discovering your Fat Soul! You’ll see. Contemporary art touches, provokes, consoles and evokes the human spirit. It leads people into waters, both still and turbulent, well known to the world’s religions: awe, wonder, bewilderment, serenity, ecstasy, solitude. These waters need not be coupled with formal belief in order to be powerful. Art and Spirit explores the intersection of art and spiritual experience by studying The Hudson River School, Martha Graham, Arlene Goldberg and creating your own digital story.

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    LBST 150 C TEC: Art as a Mode of Civic Dialogue

    This course explores artistic vehicles in their capacity as modes of civic communication. By investigating the ideal and practical roles of the individual and the state, students will discuss rights, obligations, responsibilities, and expectations implicit in the notion of citizenship, as well as how communication varies depending on forms of government, levels of technology, and civic ideology. We will look at how ancient and modern states use art to promote their chosen values, as well as ways in which art functions as a form of social/political critique. Students will complete two creative projects inspired by course content.

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    LBST 150 D TEC: Bringing Back & Saving the Lost

    Who decides what gets saved? How does society collectively forget the past? This course, whose focus will be the writing and archiving of memory after World War II, will explore memory (its absence or unreliability) as important topics in post-­‐‑WWII literature. By examining through the lens of literature, audiovisual material, and site visits, we will explore how events shape participatory citizenship. Students completing the course will be able to use the knowledge and skills gained to begin the process of understanding their own journey at Hendrix and how they will choose to remember it after they’ve graduated.

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    LBST 150 E TEC: Debates in the Liberal Arts

    What are the essential readings for a college graduate? Who decides what texts are required and how do we address the concepts and cultures that are excluded? This course will examine these complex questions from both a philosophical approach: the justification for reading classical texts (hermeneutics) and the need to adopt the curriculum to changing environments (pragmatism) as well as a historical approach, examining the role of diversity in curriculum and the various ways liberal arts colleges have addressed Western traditions. We will discuss and debate this struggle for dominance among ideas and value systems as a role of citizenship within a globalized community.

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    LBST 150 F TEC: The Engaged Listener

    Why and how do we hear? What factors interfere with sound perception? How do different approaches to listening affect the survival of organisms and the relationships among them? We will read, discuss, and write in response to these questions, using the lenses of biology and literary studies. Science and literature can give voices to those who may be silent otherwise. We will consider how to listen to these voices with attentiveness and care, and learn how to communicate what we hear to diverse audiences of fellow citizens.

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    LBST 150 G TEC: The Galactic Citizen

    We will use science fiction novels, short stories, and television episodes to explore issues affecting humanity—and even what it means to be human. How does the advancement of technology affect who we are? How can we determine what is and is not plausible scientific advancement? How does a writer whose characters are pointy-­‐‑eared aliens use space battles and lasers to tell a story about racism? What literary and cinematographic techniques do authors use to write Sci-­‐‑fi? The course will combine the scientific and literary analysis for students to critically think about and engage with issues in the modern world.

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    LBST 150 H TEC: Identity & the Need to Belong

    While identity can help us understand ourselves, it can also set the stage for judgment and misunderstanding about other people. This course explores how specific groups have negotiated their quests for belonging in recent decades and focuses specifically on identities associated with race, immigration, gender, and sexual orientation. Appreciating the importance of identity and belonging will help students become engaged citizens who are better prepared to understand themselves and others in a variety of social contexts. This course will involve discussion of what it means to belong, how groups have attempted to belong, and how these attempts have been received.

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    LBST 150 I TEC: Indigenous Americas

    Across the Americas, indigenous people are often citizens of both sovereign indigenous communities and nation-­‐‑states. This course will explore the history and current experiences of these populations as a means to think more deeply about citizenship and sovereignty in the Western Hemisphere. Through a focus on key contemporary topics, such as indigenous political activity, media representations, land and territorial rights, casino gambling, and military service, students will examine the challenges and opportunities associated with indigenous citizenship in North America and Latin America today and will consider the impact of these on their own experiences of being engaged citizens.

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    LBST 150 J TEC: Origins and Ethics

    Combining religious studies and science, this course will explore how our understanding of human origins informs our ideas about what it means to live the life of an engaged citizen. Various biblical representations of cosmic and human origins will be examined alongside scientific theories of the birth of the universe and the evolutionary origins of humankind. Students will consider the implications of these scientific and religious theories for human ethics and will be challenged to consider their own understandings of human origins and might compel them to live lives as engaged citizens.

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    LBST 150 K TEC: Religion & Democracy in the US

    In the United States there is a rich interplay of religiously motivated social reform and democratic action. Some call for democratic reform in the name of their faith; others see religion as a threat to democratic practices. In this course we will read personal histories of social reformers in the U.S as well as philosophical, political, and theological treatises that show a disparity of opinions about the place of religious expression and motivation in democratic social reform. Students are invited to explore their own views of the proper role of religion and religious expression in the democratic state.

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    LBST 150 M TEC: Work and Play

    Technology is rapidly changing our society, transforming our understanding of work and play. While artificial intelligence and robotics are displacing some human workers, corporations are striving to increase worker productivity through gamification. Computer gaming has created new concepts of identity, community, and social change, with both positive and negative implications. To be an informed citizen in this new landscape, one must first understand the historical and social contexts of this transformation. To be effective, a citizen must then be technologically equipped to create, alter, and influence these new avenues for work and play.

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    LBST 150 N TEC: Economic & Political Theory

    The Great Depression of the 1930's was a watershed event in American history. In the stress of responding to this unprecedented economic crisis, the American government became more active in managing the economy. How much the government should intervene in a free-market economy, how comprehensive a "social safety net" should be, the danger of unintended consequences, the proper level of taxation, etc., have been the subject of much debate, a debate that has grown during the Great Recession of 2008-present. We will examine the economic and political dimensions of this debate with a focus on political philosophy and economic policy."

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