Research

Welcome to our research labs
To explore the universe, to find something new, to understand what we did not understand before. That is the nature of physics, that is the nature of research.

 

  julielaser  

Dr. Robert Dunn
is developing a 51 meter ring laser gyroscope to measure seismic waves and related phenomena. Though these effects are very small, the ring laser should be able to detect a difference of 1 part in 10 million.  The ring laser work is funded by NSF and the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium.

  rocket  

Dr. Ann Wright
is doing research in the area of measurement techniques and sensors. In the past, she has developed multiple sensors for use on a hybrid rocket, including a six-degree of freedom thrust sensor. This sensor can measure the forces in all three special directions, plus the rotational moments for roll, pitch, and yaw as the rocket is fired. Recently, she has begun working to create a group of cooperative robots. Her current research students are building the robots and learning to program them to work autonomously off of sensor input.

  Damon research  

Dr. Damon Spayde
performs research in experimental nuclear physics. He is interested in exploring the structure of the universe at extremely short length scales, smaller than the nucleus of an atom. This research takes him to accelerator facilities such as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility where he is involved in experiments to measure magnetic properties of the proton (G0) and fundamental constants of the Standard Model (Qweak).

  Tinsley research  

Dr. Todd Tinsley
is a theorist working in the area of elementary particles and fields. He studies how the most fundamental constituents of matter behave in the presence of intense electromagnetic fields. The strength of these fields can only be found in the most exotic astrophysical phenomena (e.g. supernovae, magnetars) and in laboratories for the briefest of moments (~10-15s).

 

  See a list of student research talks.