Courses of Study

Philosophy Major

10 courses distributed as follows:

  • PHIL 285 Ancient Philosophy
  • PHIL 302 Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy
  • PHIL 306 Nineteenth Century Philosophy
  • PHIL 497 Senior Thesis
  • Six other philosophy courses, at least three of which must be 300-level or above. Topics not covered in courses listed in the Hendrix Catalog are available to majors through individually arranged independent studies.

Philosophy and Religion Major

10 courses distributed as follows:

  • No fewer than four courses in philosophy
  • Two must be chosen from
    • PHIL 285 Ancient Philosophy
    • PHIL 302 Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy
    • PHIL 306 Nineteenth Century Philosophy
  • No fewer than four courses in religion
  • PHIL370/RELI 370 Philosophy of Religion
  • PHIL 497 Senior Thesis or RELI 497 Senior Seminar
  • At least four other courses 200-level or above.

Philosophy and Religion Majors cannot major or minor in either philosophy or religion.

Philosophy Minor

6 courses distributed as follows:

  • PHIL 285 Ancient Philosophy
  • PHIL 302 Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Philosophy
  • PHIL 306 Nineteenth Century Philosophy
  • Three other philosophy courses, at least one of which much be 300-level or above.

    Philosophy Departmental Learning Goals: 

  1. To provide students with the opportunity to study the thought of major figures in the history of Western philosophy and thereby to educate themselves regarding the ideas, values, and philosophical perspectives that shape our civilization, and to a significant degree, provide the context in which the front-line debates of our time occur.  
  2. To provide the student with opportunities to investigate the traditional philosophical areas of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and/or social & political thought and to see how these issues stand behind concerns or interests they may have in science and religion, or regarding social issues from abortion to economic justice, or simply in pursuing the nature and meaning of a well-lived life.  
  3. To nurture students' abilities to read closely, analyze carefully, reason critically, evaluate responsibly, and think creatively.  
  4. To develop student’s ability to give both oral and written expression to their ideas, arguments and reasoning.  

All of the above applies to students majoring or minoring in philosophy as well as those majoring in philosophy and religion; the abilities which philosophy nurtures in the general student should be more fully and expressly developed in these students.