Student Learning Goals & Courses

STUDENT LEARNING GOALS

The Classics program aims to enable students:

- to acquire a knowledge of Latin and ancient Greek vocabulary, morphology, and syntax, including the technical terminology used to describe grammatical phenomena

- to translate authentic Latin and ancient Greek texts into English

- to interpret and analyze Greek and Roman texts, whether read in the original language or in English translation

- to gain an understanding of key aspects of ancient history, literature, and culture

- to investigate in depth specific topics related to the Classical world or Classical reception

- to examine the continuing influence of the Classical world beyond antiquity

- to develop skill at analyzing and synthesizing evidence from a variety of genres or media

- to express interpretive and analytic ideas in oral and written forms 

- to undertake research activities appropriate to the field of Classics


COURSES IN CLASSICS, LATIN, & GREEK

(courses with a CLAS code have no prerequisites and require no knowledge of Latin or Greek)

CLAS 200, Classical Mythology: A study of Greek and Roman mythology, particularly the structure and dynamics of the mythological cosmos and the roles assigned to mortals and immortals within it. Fulfills the LS or VA learning domain.

CLAS 250, Etymology and Philology: A study of word origins and particularly of the Latin and Greek elements of English words. This course aims to cultivate a curiosity about words and the development of the English language.

CLAS 255, Medical Etymology: A study of Greek and Latin elements in biomedical terminology. This course will be taught primarily during Maymester. Either CLAS 250 or CLAS 255 may be used toward the Classics major or minor, but not both.

CLAS 285, Ancient Philosophy:  A study of ancient Western philosophers and philosophical systems.  Subjects may include the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, and Neo-Platonism.  Cross-listed with PHIL 285; fulfills the VA learning domain.

CLAS 290, Topics in Classical Literature: Focused study of aspects of Greek and Roman literature, sometimes including a consideration of the reception of Classical literature in later time periods. Topics vary by semester. Fulfills the LS learning domain.

CLAS 294, Topics in Classical History: Focused study of aspects of Greek and Roman history. Topics vary by semester. Cross-listed with HIST 294; fulfills the HP learning domain.

CLAS 301, Greek Civilization: An integrated survey of the history, society, art, and literature of ancient Greece, from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great. Cross-listed with HIST 301; fulfills the HP learning domain.

CLAS 302, Roman Civilization: An integrated survey of the history, society, art, and literature of ancient Rome, from the early Republic to the height of the Roman Empire. Cross-listed with HIST 302; fulfills the HP learning domain.

CLAS 490, Special Topics in Classical Literature: A seminar-based course involving the focused study of particular aspects of Greek and Roman literature, sometimes including a consideration of the reception of Classical culture in later time periods. Topics vary by semester. Fulfills the LS learning domain and W2 capacity.

CLAS 495, Special Topics in Classical History: A seminar-based course involving the focused study of particular aspects of Greek and Roman history. Topics vary by semester. Fulfills the HP learning domain and W2 capacity.

LATI 110, Fundamentals of Latin I: An introduction to the basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Latin.

LATI 120, Fundamentals of Latin II: A continuation of LATI 110.  By the end of the course, students will be reading passages of Latin literature in the original. Prerequisite: LATI 110 or the equivalent. Fulfills the FL capacity.

LATI 210, Readings in Latin: Focus on the translation of Latin texts, with an emphasis on the strengthening of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Topics and authors will vary by semester. Prerequisite: LATI 120 or the equivalent.

LATI 390, Topics in Latin Literature: A course focused on the translation and interpretation of Latin texts. Because the texts and authors vary by semester, this course can be taken multiple times.  Prerequisite: LATI 210 or permission of the instructor. Fulfills the LS learning domain.

LATI 395, The Vulgate: A course focused on the Latin edition of the Bible known as the Vulgate. This course also includes a study of book history as well as hands-on workshops related to paleography, book-binding, and manuscript culture. Prerequisite: LATI 210 or permission of the instructor. Fulfills the LS learning domain and the SP Odyssey category.

LATI 410, Advanced Readings and Research in Latin Literature: A course in which the translation and interpretation of Latin texts is combined with the reading and analysis of current scholarship; the course will culminate in a research portfolio. Specific topics and authors will vary by semester. This course is designed as a capstone class for majors. Prerequisite:  a 300-level LATI course or permission of the instructor. Fulfills the LS learning domain, W2 capacity, and UR Odyssey category.

GREE 110, Fundamentals of Ancient Greek I: An introduction to the basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of ancient Greek, the language of Classical and New Testament authors.

GREE 120, Fundamentals of Ancient Greek II: A continuation of Greek 110. By the end of the course, students will be reading passages of Greek literature, both Classical and Biblical, in the original.  Prerequisite: GREE 110 or the equivalent. Fulfills the FL capacity.

GREE 210, Readings in Greek: Focus on the translation of ancient Greek texts, with an emphasis on the strengthening of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Topics and authors will vary by semester.  Prerequisite: GREE 120 or the equivalent.

GREE 390, Topics in Greek Literature: A course focused on the translation and interpretation of ancient Greek texts. Because the texts and authors covered vary by semester, this course can be taken multiple times. Prerequisite: GREE 210 or permission of the instructor. Fulfills the LS learning domain.

GREE 410, Advanced Readings and Research in Greek Literature: A course in which the translation and interpretation of ancient Greek texts is combined with the reading and analysis of current scholarship; the course will culminate in a research portfolio. Specific topics and authors will vary by semester. This course is designed as a capstone class for majors. Prerequisite: a 300-level GREE course or permission of the instructor. Fulfills the LS learning domain, W2 capacity, and UR Odyssey category.