Murphy Away Projects

The Murphy Away Projects (MAP) program supports off-campus student-faculty projects that focus on literature and language around the globe, including the United States. The program also offers faculty development support and a unique chance to mentor student research in ways previously available only in the hard sciences. Each project trip may include one or two faculty members and up to ten students. Proposals for projects ranging in cost from $200 to $20,000 are welcome.

Documents for MAP Faculty Applicants are available here:

        *Instructions for Filling Out PDF Forms*

        • Please open forms using the newest version of Adobe Reader, or, if you have it on your machine, Adobe Acrobat.(Forms will NOT behave properly if opened in Preview or other third-party PDF utilities.)
        • Pull down the "File" menu and select "Save As»PDF." Re-name and save document to your computer's desktop. Note that if you open your finished form at a later date to make changes, you will need to repeat the "Save As»PDF" process.
        • Fill in form and save changes before closing.
        • If you encounter any problems in filling out forms, please contact Sarah Engeler-Young for assistance.

        Past projects have included the following:

        • attend the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) conference with intent to expand the content and concept of the sociology class, "Exploring Nature Writing";
        • tour the outdoor Minack theatre, which is built into the side of a cliff overlooking Porthcurno Bay in Cornwall, England and see a production of Othello there; 
        • learn more about famed southern author William Faulkner, by visiting his home at Rowan Oak, the Faulkner archives at the University of Mississippi, as well as the home of his great-niece, Meg Faulkner Duchaine;
        • examine original manuscripts and documents as research for senior thesis papers at one of the best archival collections in the United States, the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center in Austin, Texas;
        • partake in the MLA Conference in Philadelphia, the largest of its kind in the United States, to hear presentations on topics including Jane Austen relating to student senior thesis papers;
        • see a performance by The Second City Comedy Troupe of Chicago and meet with the troupe for workshops and Q&A to better understand the craft of imporvisation;
        • view a collection of new films before their release to the public at the New Directors/New Films Festival in New York City sponsored by The Museum of Modern Art and The Film Society of Lincoln Center;
        • visit the Hemingway Pfeiffer Home and Museum, the restored home in which the beloved author Ernest Hemingway wrote the majority of A Farewell to Arms;
        • explore Chinese history, culture, and language in San Francisco's Chinatown district, as well as a number of cultural centers and museums in the Bay Area;
        • engage with writers, activists, and community members in northern New Mexico, and view examples of historic and contemporary land use to examine the culture and environment of the region.